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books product management

On Jeff Gothelf’s “Forever Employable.”

Forever Employable: How to Stop Looking for Work and Let Your Next Job Find You.

A book by Jeff Gothelf.

Bookshop link. 

Sometimes my wife and I get into these conversations where I tell her about great advice I received, whether I read it in a book, or heard it from a colleague.

And she would say, “But I told you that before!” Which was sometimes true—I just didn’t recognize it as great advice then.

Sometimes it’s because of the way the advice is presented or framed, whether as a gentle suggestion or a swift kick in the pants.

Sometimes you hear something four or five times but the sixth time’s the charm.

Sometimes you’re just not ready to hear things yet. I’m reminded here of Nick Cave, on songwriting, emphases mine:

“You are not the ‘Great Creator’ of your songs, you are simply their servant, and the songs will come to you when you have adequately prepared yourself to receive them. They are not inside you, unable to get out; rather, they are outside of you, unable to get in.”

Some fortuitous combination allowed Jeff Gothelf’s Forever Employable to get in. Some of it has to do with my own receptivity, after being well-primed by some great managers of mine, and excellent career coaches along the way. But a lot of it has to do with Gothelf’s lucid, pragmatic style, and the way he gives you pointers to put into practice immediately.

Categories
product management

Design Thinking and Storytelling: A Short Reading List in Progress

(A small disclaimer: a lot of thinking out loud is about to follow, with the caveat that I may revise and update this later for something slightly more polished. Sometimes I write more crafted entries (as with my movie / book / game posts), but it feels like a burden to have to deliver than just messily laying my thoughts out on the screen. So consider it a living document.)

The other week I told my colleagues they needed to be more like Yoda. It was part of a two-hour Design Thinking and Storytelling class I taught at work—yes, at work, and the truth is, this is fun stuff. It has been a blast to contribute to the work of an amazing team creating an online curriculum on implementing Product Management at the Fed, and I’m grateful to have been tapped for the effort.

What follows further below is a ramblingly annotated list of references, all of which were extremely helpful as I wrote up my seminar, which I sent, minus most of the commentary, to the participants after class.

Here’s what I do for this introductory class:

  • take elements of cinema and some of my own experience in writing fiction
  • combine it with my day job as a product manager
  • advocate for deeper and longer qualitative user research (I used to be an anthropologist after all)
  • wrap it up in marketing principles
  • and teach co-workers about it.
From Unsplash.

No lie; this floats my boat. In the class, I’m able to talk about why Walter White’s motivations as a character need to be established early in Breaking Bad and the importance of staying in the problem space to clarify and refine the root challenge towards designing a product. Or what Luke Skywalker has to do with customer success. Or I compare Amazon’s “Buy now with 1-Click” buttons with the famous scene in The Terminator when Kyle Reese tells Sarah Connor, “Come with me if you want to live.” (They’re both calls to action, of course.)

This month’s class was my third time to teach about storytelling and product management—I had been teaching it informally to my teammates (more later)—but my first time to be part of a formal curriculum, and my first time to include a brief overview of Design Thinking. I did send a note to the class explaining that one could take hours of classes on any one of the phases alone—or a lifetime if you’re in user research—and that what they were about to hear was simply the tip of the tip of the iceberg. This wasn’t even design theater (ouch) as Christina Wodtke has put it, but more of an amuse-bouche, I hope.

Categories
product management

What Luke Skywalker and Your Customer Have in Common: Thoughts on Emotional Needs

The other week I was conducting a storytelling and product management workshop—more on this in a future blog entry—and walking people through an exercise on customer needs. I had instructed the participants, who were IT managers and officers, to write down fictional characters and their needs, and then analyze the latter in terms of a functional dimension, and an emotional dimension:

Functional: A young man needs to blow up the Death Star and save the galaxy from the Evil Empire.

Emotional: Luke wants a larger purpose in the galaxy and longs to be a Jedi like his father.1

Then I asked the participants to think of the following:

  • actual customers and their needs,
  • the functional dimension, and
  • the emotional dimension

Simple, I thought: Functional needs were easy. We worked in IT, so we saw functional requirements all day. But the emotional dimension? A couple of participants expressed difficulty with this part of the exercise, and in the moment I, too, was stumped, because I was so used to baking in the qualitative outcome in my storytelling framework, and couldn’t properly describe to the participants what seemed to be a bit of a mental leap.

How do I work backwards, and contextualize how one gathers this “emotional requirement,” as it were? Some thoughts follow.

Categories
games

Vengeance: Session Report and Review

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Vengeance

A game by Gordon Calleja

Mighty Boards

Board Game Geek listing

Three in the morning and no one out in the streets except him and a stray dog sniffing around a dumpster.

Shadowman steps out into the light and looks around the corner of the alley at the old printing shop. A nondescript building in a dilapidated neighborhood, hollowed out by redlining and neglect after white folks lit out for the suburbs. Nothing but abandoned warehouses and junkie squats and the occasional gang hideout. Griffon Printing, reads a weather-beaten sign hanging from a pole. Creaking in the wind. Newspaper blowing across the street like tumbleweed.

Storm blowing in. Coming for Roxy Kween and her empire of dirt.

Categories
games

Mage Knight: Session Report and Review

For a few years now I’ve been writing session reports over at Board Game Geek. I thought I’d expand on some of my entries—especially the ones where I dive into something more creative—and post them on the blog. Below is the first one I ever wrote, back in March of 2016, followed by a new section that describes the game a little more for non-gamers, then some thoughts on why I like it.

The Mage Knight box cover.

Mage Knight

A game by Vlaada Chvatil.

Wiz Kids.

BGG listing.

Tovak paused in his weary trudge and lifted his helmet to look at the White City behind him. He was reluctant to leave his swordsmen behind, but they were spent, riding under the Banner of Fear, having expended their energies in conquering the beast guardians of the city. Now they were healing their sore limbs with drink, and perhaps other unsavory pursuits besides, and Tovak could not blame them: he had, after all, threatened them by his sword to join his company, and he was now known as a mage knight of ill repute.

Tovak turned to face the lake, the cold moon shivering on its surface. It was deceptively calm. The villagers had spoken of a rampaging draconum hidden in its depths, and Tovak warmed to the challenge, despite his weariness. He had battled its likes before, in a tomb just a few leagues away; the sepulcher had yielded a spell written on parchment, and four mana crystals, the greatest haul of his career. But slaying this draconum was his last chance to prove himself a mage knight of some renown, and to repair his tarnished reputation—one final attempt before the sun rose.