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Breaking Bad: “One Minute” (2010).

In an earlier entry I wrote that those water cooler moments in Breaking Bad were, inevitably, the action set pieces and the sudden bursts of violence, but it’s the quiet moments that resonate the most.

Okay, I lied, because this episode ends in a sequence* that had me yelling Holy freaking Mexican cousins! all alone at home.

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Breaking Bad, “Green Light” (2010).

The funniest scene of the show so far — though the memory may be heightened by the fact that I was watching this right after surgery, and that I probably shouldn’t have been laughing — is of Walt trying helplessly to chuck a potted plant through an office window in the episode “Green Light“. Impotent (in a general sense) and frustrated, Walt clumsily fails in his mission, and, in an even funnier scene a minute later, ends up lunging after the oily Saul Goodman instead.

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Steve Pink, “Hot Tub Time Machine” (2010).

Hot Tub Time Machine

So my self-imposed challenge of the month of September was to write one blog entry a day – short little squibs, at the very least, then stretched if the movie, good or bad, warranted the extra space. So far, so good; except for a couple days here and there, I was able to muster the writing discipline to crank something out every day.

However, I can’t think of a better illustration of the garbage-in-garbage-out principle than what I’ve done in the last thirty days, but the truth is that I was stuck in a bit of a writing bind. The more depth there potentially was to a film, the more difficult it would be to meet my daily deadline, since I wouldn’t be content with writing only 150 words on, say, Mesrine. So soldier on I did, gamely watching the summer movie franchises and telling myself I’d be popping them into the DVD player anyway at some point, and stepping up to the daily routine of writing. A mostly rewarding experience, as you can imagine.

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Bill Viola, “Chott el-Djerid (A Portrait in Light and Heat)” (1979).

Chott el-Djerid

Since we’re experiencing a relative heatwave in the Bay Area, I thought I’d write about something vaguely appropriate. Bill Viola’s video is set in a 5,000-square kilometer salt lake in the Sahara Desert that receives 100 millimeters of rain a year, according to Wikipedia. (Chott el-Djerid is also famous for something entirely cinematically different: it stands in for the planet of Tatooine in the Star Wars saga.)

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Stephen Norrington, “Blade” (1998).

Blade

As you folks can probably tell, I’m working my way through the summer movie franchises — for it certainly feels like summer in the Bay Area right now — and Blade nicely satisfies my jones for action-fantasy, especially if gouts of blood are involved. (You could do worse, like with Resident Evil, or with any of the Scorpion King installments.) All the inadvertent phallic campiness aside — and an unnecessary semi-incestuous subplot — it’s a fun, bloody romp.